5 years ago#1
lowkey
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I heard somewhere that "white gas" is supposedly the same as unleaded gasoline.
For starters, is Coleman fuel the same as white gas? If that is so, then let`s say I found myself running out of gas and happened to have a gallon of coleman fuel in the car, could I dump that coleman fuel into my car`s gas tank?

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5 years ago#2
Ramses
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Some "fleet" vehicles run on propane. But your car has to be modified to run on propane. I believe some newer minivans are dual fuel. (Gasoline or propane). But don`t quote me on that.
In your scenario, if you ran out of gas and dumped in the coleman fuel . . . the car would probably run like ****, if it ran at all. I don`t recommend it. -Dave

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5 years ago#3
Pennington
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or "white gas" is a liquid fuel. It is close enough to unleaded that many white gas camp stoves can burn unleaded without modification, if you don`t mind your food smelling like gasoline. But whether you can go the other way and run Coleman fuel in a car, I don`t know. I would worry, for example, that the octane rating might be too low and the engine would knock.

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5 years ago#4
reltney
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usually Naptha and a couple other ultra-light (in the sense that 10W30 oil is "lighter" than say, 5W20) and extra volatile oils, and is a liquid at normal (as in "not compressed&quot pressure and temperature. Propane is just that: Propane, and it`s a gas unless under a fairly high amount of pressure, or at low (-32F) temperature. The only similarity between the two is that they both burn.

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5 years ago#5
Jacci
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"SlipperySlope" wrote 1) Coleman fuel is Naptha 2) It can be used in a car, as it has no lead. It has no anti-knock or other additives, either, so should be used for emergency only. 3) White gas is used often when Naptha would be more correct; they are the same.

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5 years ago#6
dropshot85
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My brother ran into this very scenario with his mid-70s Jeep.
He ran out of gas, and dumped in Coleman stove fuel. As other replies in this thread have surmised, his engine was knocking all the way to the gas station. After a fill-up, all was fine.

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5 years ago#7
noodles
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it`s timing adjusted,and should suffer a power loss with Coleman fuel.

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5 years ago#8
HappyHippie
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PROPANE??!!?

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5 years ago#9
Offroad Johnny
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Neither vehicle had a catalytic converter or Oxygen sensor so I can`t say for sure that it wouldn`t harm either but suspect it wouldn`t. Both cars pinged horribly on the Coleman but made it to the gas station without ill result and went well over 100,000 Miles afterwards. Newer vehicles might flag the "Check Engine" light if it runs out of adaptation trying to eliminate the spark knock or possibly even set a degraded cat code as I doubt the Coleman is an "oxygenated" fuel. Still... reseting the light later beats walking now!

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5 years ago#10
newsfella
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tried it in a car.

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5 years ago#11
JUSTINSHOTTTTTTT!! !!!
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I worked in a gas plant for summer jobs back in 1980 and 81. Natural gas came into the plant from wells. Methane (went to homes), propane, butane and "gasoline" left the plant. We called the gasoline "white gas" as it was clear. I know several people who used this in their cars and trucks and I never heard of any damage, but they did knock and ping. They also used this in their Coleman lanterns and stoves.
Back in the 70`s, I remember seeing my dad use Coleman fuel in the lawnmower to finish cutting the grass when we ran out of gasoline. Ran fine. bb

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5 years ago#12
lhota
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The Coleman fuel or white gas is probably more suitable for a lawn mower than a modern automobile. I think that the distinction with white gas is the same as with kerosene. The clearer the fuel, the cleaner it burns. You don`t want to choke when you use a kerosene heater or a camp stove, lantern, etc. has additives to suspend water I believe, it has carcinogenic MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether) to oxygenate it in an attempt to reduce emissions, and it has measured amounts of octane, which prevents knocking by elongating the burn time. Obviously you wouldn`t want to use it for a stove or lantern. Obviously a car can burn white gas but it probably isn`t a good idea to use it as its regular fuel or to use it straight. the way. I don`t know if I added anything new here but maybe some clarity to some things that were already said.

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5 years ago#13
Piper2hood
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the stinkier portions removed. Might work in a diesel, but not in a gasoline engine.

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