4 years ago#1
Gratefulked420
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I am applying for my senior driving license now, I am nearly 18 years old. I was eligible at 17 and 1/2 (a few months ago). On the form it asks:
"Have you ever been involved in a crash in which you were partially or fully responsible during the past 1 year?" and
"If yes, you are not eligible to apply."
The answer is yes to the question, back in January I was involved in a little fender bender on a dangerous (and very accident prone) area on a freeway onramp where there is construction (accident was at around 3-5 MPH).
Anyway there was little damage to my car and the other car and I paid the other sides damages to his car. We both agreed on the side of the road not to report it and I would pay the damages. However, a few minutes later a state trooper came up (It`s on a busy road, however it was late at night).
Long story short, I believe he said that he just had to take down the information since he was there, and that he would hold it for both of us incase we couldn`t make contact wit one another. I believe he said that it would not be reported to the DOT and that it would be destroyed after 90 days.
Back to the original question (My state is Pennsylvania btw), since this is a non-reportable accident, and I believe that there was no fault taken down by the trooper, can I answer no to this question?

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4 years ago#2
Gratefulked420
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X-posting to phl.transportation

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4 years ago#3
Mardicom
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I wouldn`t bother reporting it. But I`m a risk taker . . .

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4 years ago#4
HantaMouse
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The drivers in an area driving with their collective heads up their ****, I can believe.
An area where people typically drive way too fast for conditions, I can understand.
Some place that construction equipment and conditions create a situation where the careless can get bent, most certainly.
Yet an area that is to blame for a crash? Hardly...

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4 years ago#5
the Schluess
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the current design is partly to blame.

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4 years ago#6
HantaMouse
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Action lead time perhaps you might think of easing off the pressure on the throttle... 23 years, from sheer ice and blinding snow (in Montana) to 150? desert heat in Nevada... including a four year stint on Guam where they used crushed coral to pave the roads* I have yet to see an example of "poor design" or "poor sinage" that would cause me to crash.
*Coral paved roads are extremely slippery. When it rains the algae living in the coral oozes out like snot. It is also very suseptible to polishing by the tyres traveling over it. It gets polished as smooth as glass. So when it rains you are driving/riding on snot covered glass... More slippery than any ice I`ve ever seen. The people who live there know this... It`s a fact of life there... Yet every week there`s a big crash somewhere on the island where the driver was "surprised" at how slippery the road was... Just another example of the "blame someone else" mentality that is gaining so much popularity these days...

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4 years ago#7
dionysus_myth
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factor. All on ramps are more dangerous that roads that do not intersect. Also, areas deceptively marked with signs or road paint (or lack thereof) would contribute to an increased risk. There are areas I know of that are "accident prone." Freeway entrance ramps with stop signs at the end of them when you are expected to merge on a freeway with 70+ mph traffic from a dead stop, for one. Others include freeway entrances where you can not see the road you are merging onto until you have insufficient room to stop if you are traveling the speeds generally traveled on the road (which also would mean that you have insufficient space to accelerate to the appropriate speeds as well).
These areas are "accident prone." There are specific road designs that are avoided (but are common among older roads or some new construction where space and cost lead politicians to pick a less safe design for political reasons). They are avoided because they lead to more crashes. Also, construction areas are always considered "accident prone." That is why the feds blackmailed the states to pass laws to increase penalties for traffic violations in construction zones.

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